Greetings from the Green Mind

6 02 2007

Hi all! My name is Tony Atayde and in this, my very first column, let’s gets a few things straight.

First and foremost, I am not the Tony Atayde who works for Nike. That is my son (obvious ba) and I am very proud of him for being in a company like Nike.

Second, my opinions are my own and in no way reflect that of my son. Third, I am as green as green can get. In fact, I am so green that my favorite NBA basketball team are the Boston Celtics.

Lastly, though I am a Lasallian through and through, my loyalty is to the institution and not to individual players. When they play well, I will be the first to pat them on the back. But, when they play I will also be the first to kick them in the butt.

I got this column through a good friend, Kim Lesaca. Kim and I are both members of a Boston Celtics e-group as we are die-hard Celtics fans. He asked me some months ago if I would be interested to write for this website since I was already a feature writer for ANIMO MAGAZINE. I had been writing about the Green Archers and also cover the games for many Lasallian websites.

So, I got an email from Mike Abasolo with the link to this site and when I clicked it, what greeted was just surreal. The one La Salle player who I absolutely loathe was on the main page of the site. Yes, I am not and never will be a Joseph Yeo fan. In fact, in all the years he played for La Salle, I always felt that he was the most overrated player of the team, the league, the country, the world. I would cringe every time this guy would step on the floor.

Now that I have that out of my system and don’t ever have to write the Y word again, I’m happy.

So, come back to this site and keep your finger on the mouse. The Lasallian with the GREENEST MIND is on cyberspace. My next column will be about the word ANIMO came about and how La Salle was the very first team to use it.

Oh and by the way, you are getting a 2 for 1 deal here. My 21 year old son Aaron, will also join me in a “Dad Says, Son Says” portion of my column.
Until the next time! ANIMO!

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11 responses

15 04 2007
Ricardo

Hi Tony!

Glad that you mentioned about “Animo”, a Spanish word derived from Latin.

Here’s the Bedan way (far different from La Salle), the Spanish/Latino way, and probably the correct way of using “Animo”. Just wanted to share this information.

As Bedan verbal tradition goes, when we Bedans cheer “Animo San Beda!” we actually mean “Courage San Beda!/Have Courage San Beda!/Take courage San Beda!”

Since the beginning of time , we have remained faithful to this meaning which is consistent with an underlying Bedan theme, COURAGE. Of course the word “animo” when cheered also means cheer up!, chin up!, come on!. But we prefer courage and have courage to have consistency.

The Red banner, the Red Lion Rampant of SCotland, the North American Indian, the Bedan Hymn and many other Bedan symbolisms speak of courage.

á·ni·mo
m.
1. – spirit
2. (energía) – energy, vitality
¡ánimo! – courage!
caerse los ánimos – to lose heart
dar ánimo a – to encourage
estar ánimos para (tener ánimos para) – to be in the mood to
http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/entry?lb=e&p=num%3As1510

Ánimo (Spanish m.) soul, mind, courage, intention
¡ánimo!, ‘come on!, ‘cheer up!’
http://www.dolmetsch.com/defsa7.htm

*ánimo* _m._ courage, spirit
http://www.mi-direccion.com/contigo-pan-y-cebolla/pan-y-cebolla-24.html

II excl ¡ánimo!, cheer up!
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=animo

Here’s another Spanish-English dictionary for easy reference:

http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/spanish/%E1nimo;_ylt=AiCekGsqGP4ARGc0OjdMQIP_s8sF

á·ni·mo

m.

1. (alma) spirit
2. (energía) energy, vitality
trabajar con ánimo; to work with energy
3. (intención) purpose, will

Idioms:

¡Ãnimo! = courage!

caerse los ánimos = to lose heart, become discouraged

dar ánimo a = to encourage

estar or tener ánimos para = to be in the mood to, decide to

This is the way we use “Animo San Beda!” This is where we have differentiated ourselves from the rest.

Animo used as a word of encouragement, in the context of cheering someone up.

Sometimes it is usefull to look for the definition of the words directly in its original language.

Here are links where “Animo” were used the Bedan way:

We use ¡animo! to give courage. To encourage you to continue doing what you were doing.
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2932

“Animo muchachas! Courage women!” Silvia tells her new team, slapping them on the shoulders. “We’re going to win!”
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/07/07/Floridian/Away_games.shtml

There were people there cheering, saying “ánimo”, which means “courage” and I went downhill seeing some runners around 200 m ahead. Then, I went on to see some ugly industrial buildings at the entrance of Carboneras, a concrete factory and an electric plant.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-253.html

ANIMO (“courage” en espagnol) est d’ailleurs un mot peint sur la pierre que l’on rencontre souvent sur le chemin. Impossible de rester mal en point au bord du chemin, quelqu’un s’occupera de toi dans les 5 ou 10 minutes qui viennent.
http://galice.net.free.fr/galice.net/camino_santiago_antoin.htm

¡Animo! Take Courage! A Pilgrim’s Notes on El Camino de Compostela
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005012906.html

People said “Ánimo, que ya queda poco”. “Come on, ( Courage ), it is nearly over”. I remember a boy sitting on a wheelchair, who seemed to have a brain paralysis, saying “Ánimo”.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-1006.html

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

Come to think of it, we have a Spanish cheer which goes like this.

El Colegio de San Beda Tiene que ganar! (Spanish Cheer)

El Colegio de San Beda
Tiene que ganar!

Animo, bravo, viva!
San Beda San Beda Arriba
Luchar, zumbar, acudir Hasta morir

Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda
Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda

Trust us Bedans.

Even the late Pope John Paul II used “Animo” just like the Bedans use:

Seeing the crowd battling with the rain, the Pope began to say: “Be strong! Courage! Animo! Coraggio!” It was during the Sprinkling Rite of the Mass which reminds us of our baptism, and people were sprinkled indeed!

http://www.michaeljournal.org/wyd2002.htm

Animo! Have Courage!

P.S.

Thank you for reading the very long post.

15 04 2007
Ricardo

I guess I have to begin again.

Here’s the Bedan position with regards the word Animo.

As Bedan verbal tradition goes, when we Bedans cheer “Animo San Beda!” we actually mean; “Courage San Beda!” ; “Have Courage San Beda!” ; or “Take Courage San Beda!”.

Since the beginning of time , we have remained faithful to this meaning which is consistent with an underlying Bedan theme, COURAGE. Of course the word “animo” when cheered also means cheer up!, chin up!, come on!. But we prefer courage and have courage to have consistency.

The Red banner, the Red Lion Rampant of the Scot, the North American Indian, the Bedan Hymn and many other Bedan tradition speak of courage.

Kindly refer to the online Spanish-English entires provided below:

á·ni·mo
m.
1. – spirit
2. (energía) – energy, vitality
¡ánimo! – courage!
caerse los ánimos – to lose heart
dar ánimo a – to encourage
estar ánimos para (tener ánimos para) – to be in the mood to
http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/entry?lb=e&p=num%3As1510

Ánimo (Spanish m.) soul, mind, courage, intention
¡ánimo!, ‘come on!, ‘cheer up!’
http://www.dolmetsch.com/defsa7.htm

*ánimo* _m._ courage, spirit
http://www.mi-direccion.com/contigo-pan-y-cebolla/pan-y-cebolla-24.html

II excl ¡ánimo!, cheer up!
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=animo

15 04 2007
danny

This is the way we use “Animo San Beda!” This is where we have differentiated ourselves from the rest, by being authentic with the meaning of the word as taught to us by the Spanish Benedicitne Monks for decades now. Yup, it’s old. It’s tradition.

In this context the, the issue of “who-used-it-first” becomes an non-issue. It is like asking who used “Fight” first in cheering.

Animo used as a word of encouragement, in the context of cheering someone up. However, using the word in a declarative manner, the other definition becomes operational. “Bedan Animo” then becomes “Bedan Spirit”. The idiosyncracy of the Spanish language. But that’s a different story.

It is always usefull to look for the definition of words as used by native Spanish/Latino speakers which we will do in the next part.

15 04 2007
danny

As Bedan verbal tradition goes, when we Bedans cheer “Animo San Beda!” we actually mean :”Courage San Beda!”; “Have Courage San Beda!”; “Take Courage San Beda!”.

Since the beginning of time , we have remained faithful to this meaning which is consistent with an underlying Bedan theme, COURAGE. Of course the word “animo” when cheered also means cheer up!, chin up!, come on!. But we prefer courage and have courage to have consistency.

The Red banner, the Red Lion, the North American Indian, the Bedan Hymn and many other Bedan tradition speak of courage.

Kindle refer to the online dictionares provides for quick transalation:

á·ni·mo
m.
1. – spirit
2. (energía) – energy, vitality
¡ánimo! – courage!
caerse los ánimos – to lose heart
dar ánimo a – to encourage
estar ánimos para (tener ánimos para) – to be in the mood to
http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/entry?lb=e&p=num%3As1510

Ánimo (Spanish m.) soul, mind, courage, intention
¡ánimo!, ‘come on!, ‘cheer up!’
http://www.dolmetsch.com/defsa7.htm

*ánimo* _m._ courage, spirit
http://www.mi-direccion.com/contigo-pan-y-cebolla/pan-y-cebolla-24.html

II excl ¡ánimo!, cheer up!
http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=animo

16 04 2007
danny

Finally, here’s how “Animo” is used by Spanish speaker. Take note that these are similar to the Bedan way.

To quote:

We use ¡animo! to give courage. To encourage you to continue doing what you were doing.
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2932

“Animo muchachas! Courage women!” Silvia tells her new team, slapping them on the shoulders. “We’re going to win!”
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/07/07/Floridian/Away_games.shtml

There were people there cheering, saying “ánimo”, which means “courage” and I went downhill seeing some runners around 200 m ahead. Then, I went on to see some ugly industrial buildings at the entrance of Carboneras, a concrete factory and an electric plant.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-253.html

ANIMO (“courage” en espagnol) est d’ailleurs un mot peint sur la pierre que l’on rencontre souvent sur le chemin. Impossible de rester mal en point au bord du chemin, quelqu’un s’occupera de toi dans les 5 ou 10 minutes qui viennent.
http://galice.net.free.fr/galice.net/camino_santiago_antoin.htm

¡Animo! Take Courage! A Pilgrim’s Notes on El Camino de Compostela
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005012906.html

People said “Ánimo, que ya queda poco”. “Come on, ( Courage ), it is nearly over”. I remember a boy sitting on a wheelchair, who seemed to have a brain paralysis, saying “Ánimo”.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-1006.html

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

I hope the Bedan way is clear to all.

Come to think of it, we actually have a pre-war Spanish cheer which goes like this:

El Colegio de San Beda Tiene que ganar! (Spanish Cheer)

El Colegio de San Beda
Tiene que ganar!

Animo, bravo, viva!
San Beda San Beda Arriba
Luchar, zumbar, acudir Hasta morir

Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda
Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda

16 04 2007
danny

As I have said earlier, it is usefull to look for the definition of the word in the context of how it is used by actual Spanish speaker as follows:

We use ¡animo! to give courage. To encourage you to continue doing what you were doing.
http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2932

“Animo muchachas! Courage women!” Silvia tells her new team, slapping them on the shoulders. “We’re going to win!”
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/07/07/Floridian/Away_games.shtml

There were people there cheering, saying “ánimo”, which means “courage” and I went downhill seeing some runners around 200 m ahead. Then, I went on to see some ugly industrial buildings at the entrance of Carboneras, a concrete factory and an electric plant.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-253.html

ANIMO (“courage” en espagnol) est d’ailleurs un mot peint sur la pierre que l’on rencontre souvent sur le chemin. Impossible de rester mal en point au bord du chemin, quelqu’un s’occupera de toi dans les 5 ou 10 minutes qui viennent.
http://galice.net.free.fr/galice.net/camino_santiago_antoin.htm

¡Animo! Take Courage! A Pilgrim’s Notes on El Camino de Compostela
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005012906.html

People said “Ánimo, que ya queda poco”. “Come on, ( Courage ), it is nearly over”. I remember a boy sitting on a wheelchair, who seemed to have a brain paralysis, saying “Ánimo”.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-1006.html

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

16 04 2007
danny

I sure hope my expamples of “Animo” as used by by actual Spanish speakers will be published. It’s part and parcel of our simple contextual analysis.

Thank you.

16 04 2007
danny

And more:

ANIMO (“courage” en espagnol) est d’ailleurs un mot peint sur la pierre que l’on rencontre souvent sur le chemin. Impossible de rester mal en point au bord du chemin, quelqu’un s’occupera de toi dans les 5 ou 10 minutes qui viennent.
http://galice.net.free.fr/galice.net/camino_santiago_antoin.htm

¡Animo! Take Courage! A Pilgrim’s Notes on El Camino de Compostela
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0512/2005012906.html

People said “Ánimo, que ya queda poco”. “Come on, ( Courage ), it is nearly over”. I remember a boy sitting on a wheelchair, who seemed to have a brain paralysis, saying “Ánimo”.
http://www.runningcommentary.co.uk/forum/archive/index.php?t-1006.html

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

16 04 2007
danny

Finally.

“Animo. Take courage. Soon we will be together in heaven.” With that I ask you to give you full attention to the following testimony.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/2964/homily32Sundayc.html

Why are we so sure with our usage?

It is because even the late Pope John Paul II used animo to mean courage:

Seeing the crowd battling with the rain, the Pope began to say: “Be strong! Courage! Animo! Coraggio!” It was during the Sprinkling Rite of the Mass which reminds us of our baptism, and people were sprinkled indeed! http://www.michaeljournal.org/wyd2002.htm

This is the Bedan way rooted in our Spanish tradition.

16 04 2007
danny

Even the late Pope John Paul II agreed with Bedans:

Seeing the crowd battling with the rain, the Pope began to say: “Be strong! Courage! Animo! Coraggio!” It was during the Sprinkling Rite of the Mass which reminds us of our baptism, and people were sprinkled indeed!

http://www.michaeljournal.org/wyd2002.htm

16 04 2007
danny

Here’s a pre-war Bedan Spanish cheer. The word animo, bravo, viva, arriba are words used to encourage the team. When “Animo” is used to encourage a team, remember the Bedan way. The authentic Spanish way.

El Colegio de San Beda Tiene que ganar! (Spanish Cheer)

El Colegio de San Beda
Tiene que ganar!

Animo, bravo, viva!
San Beda San Beda Arriba
Luchar, zumbar, acudir Hasta morir

Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda
Adelante, Victoria
San Beda San Beda San Beda

Thank you Tony for the time!

BTW, I also studied in La Salle, but remained a Bedan. Animo!

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